Millions of people in America are receiving injectables, like fillers and Botox, to correct or soften fine lines and wrinkles. Many of us are also becoming more self conscious about what chemicals we expose our bodies to, both topically and internally. Cosmetic acupuncture is claiming to be the latest “green” beauty treatment available to try to meet both demands.

History of Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a 2,000 year old treatment that originated in China. It is an ancient holistic treatment option that works by stimulating points both on or under the skin. When needles are inserted superficially at specific points in the body, the nerves are supposed to be stimulated in that area. These small needles work by activating the body’s own self-healing mechanism.

In 1996, the acupuncture needles were classified as medical devices by the FDA. There have been many scientific studies done on acupuncture for pain management. However, there have been no scientific studies showing that acupuncture works cosmetically.

Cosmetic Acupuncture vs. Injectables

Cosmetic acupuncture, also known as facial acupuncture, is said to stimulate collagen production, improve overall skin quality, improve acne and even help heal acne scars. As mentioned above, acupuncture heals by activating the body’s own self-healing. The tiny needles create traumas, which stimulates collagen production and encourage blood flow.

A facial acupuncture treatment involves approximately 40 needles in the face and another dozen on the body, although the amount does vary depending on an individuals goals and anatomy. Each treatment can take about 20-30 minutes. Facial acupuncture also touts additional benefits, such as improved digestion and reduced anxiety.

Many professionals in the cosmetic industry do not believe facial acupuncture is equivalent to facial injections but do consider this treatment to be a light dose of skin rejuvenation, which does improve skin tone and texture while stimulating collagen production.

As most of us know, Botox works by temporarily weakening muscle activity. Facial acupuncture, on the other hand, does not have the ability to “freeze” or weaken muscle activity. While acupuncture needles are causing trauma to improve skin health, it’s effects do not compare to the level of Botox treatments or moderate to more aggressive skin rejuvenation treatments performed under a medical license.

If you do decide to give cosmetic acupuncture a shot, don’t expect results right away. Acupuncturists say it can take up to 10 treatments to get your desired results.

Have you or do you know someone who has tried cosmetic acupuncture? Let us know in the comments below!

To learn more about facial rejuvenation, please call our office at (801) 776-2220 or contact us HERE.

 

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Draper Office
114 E 12450 S
Suite 206
Draper, UT 84020

Layton Office
2255 N 1700 W
Suite 205
Layton, UT 84041

Don't Hesitate To
Contact Us

Draper Office

  • 114 E 12450 S
  • /
  • Suite 206
  • /
  • Draper, UT84020

Layton Office

  • 2255 N 1700 W
  • /
  • Suite 205
  • /
  • Layton, UT84041

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